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IRON HAN.

Genius billionaire playboy philanthropist by day, scruffy-looking nerf herder by night.

Hannah. Han for short, as in Solo.

Comic shop assistant manager. Opinionated with a side of nerdy. Iron Man junkie, Mass Effect activist, film critic, literary fiend, lover of tattoos and boys with earrings. Sometimes an artist, occasionally a writer, and always a connoisseur of bad fic.

NOTE: If you want to tag me in something and get my attention, tag it with “Iron Han”, without the dash.

wouldyouliketoseemymask:

The above panel is from the 1941 issue World’s Finest Comics #3 and is the first glimpse into the childhood of Jonathan Crane, better known as Batman villain The Scarecrow. The issue also marks the introduction of the character; dissatisfied with his teaching salary, Professor Crane turned to crime in order to make more money and therefore gain the respect of his colleagues. He began working as a gun-for-hire, and chose the Scarecrow moniker as a symbol of “poverty and fear combined”. 

wouldyouliketoseemymask:

The above panel is from the 1941 issue World’s Finest Comics #3 and is the first glimpse into the childhood of Jonathan Crane, better known as Batman villain The Scarecrow. The issue also marks the introduction of the character; dissatisfied with his teaching salary, Professor Crane turned to crime in order to make more money and therefore gain the respect of his colleagues. He began working as a gun-for-hire, and chose the Scarecrow moniker as a symbol of “poverty and fear combined”. 

posted 1 day agovia©reblog
posted 5 months agovia©reblog
posted 7 months agovia©reblog

heathledger:

MY FAVORITE CHARACTERS

Dr. Jonathan Crane (Batman Begins, TDK, TDKR)

Dr. Crane isn’t here right now, but if you’d like to make an appointment…

posted 10 months agovia©reblog

“I can say that he is not going to be as theatrical a character as he was in the early comic books,” (Cillian Murphy) muses. “There’s this underlying theme of fear that runs through the Batman character anyway, it’s fear that causes Bruce Wayne to become Batman. For the Scarecrow, it’s kind of the opposite. Reading the comic books that D.C. sent me I learned that he was terribly bullied, an outcast and a geek when he was younger. Those were the formative experiences for Crane. What I did was look at all of the different incarnations of the character throughout the comic books and kept all of that information in my head. I used as much or as little as I needed in the different scenes that we shot. I think the character should be scary as hell, because that fear toxin he uses is a pretty ferocious thing.”
“Crane is not a good guy,” Murphy adds in conclusion. “I think it comes from serious, deep issues from a very young age. I think he’s got a serious inferiority complex, although he’s brilliant at the same time. And the Scarecrow incarnation—well, aren’t all of these villains a little whacked out? I think it’s much more interesting when there’s a distinction between the two sides of the character because when you put on a mask you want to justify it. The freedom the mask allows someone is to live all those fantasies in your head, good or bad, without revealing yourself.”

“I can say that he is not going to be as theatrical a character as he was in the early comic books,” (Cillian Murphy) muses. “There’s this underlying theme of fear that runs through the Batman character anyway, it’s fear that causes Bruce Wayne to become Batman. For the Scarecrow, it’s kind of the opposite. Reading the comic books that D.C. sent me I learned that he was terribly bullied, an outcast and a geek when he was younger. Those were the formative experiences for Crane. What I did was look at all of the different incarnations of the character throughout the comic books and kept all of that information in my head. I used as much or as little as I needed in the different scenes that we shot. I think the character should be scary as hell, because that fear toxin he uses is a pretty ferocious thing.”

“Crane is not a good guy,” Murphy adds in conclusion. “I think it comes from serious, deep issues from a very young age. I think he’s got a serious inferiority complex, although he’s brilliant at the same time. And the Scarecrow incarnation—well, aren’t all of these villains a little whacked out? I think it’s much more interesting when there’s a distinction between the two sides of the character because when you put on a mask you want to justify it. The freedom the mask allows someone is to live all those fantasies in your head, good or bad, without revealing yourself.”

posted 1 year agovia©reblog
twitterversecrazies:

bitch plz

twitterversecrazies:

bitch plz

posted 1 year agovia©reblog
posted 1 year agovia©reblog
posted 1 year agovia©reblog
posted 1 year agovia©reblog
posted 1 year agovia©reblog